World War 3: India-Pakistan war could cause NUCLEAR WINTER – ‘no one is safe’ “WAR between India and Pakistan could plunge temperatures to below ice age”

WAR between India and Pakistan could plunge temperatures to below ice age conditions, bringing a nuclear winter which would “destroy civilisation” and starve 90 percent of the population to deathN

WAR between India and Pakistan could plunge temperatures to below ice age conditions, bringing a nuclear winter which would “destroy civilisation” and starve 90 percent of the population to death.

By KATIE WESTONPUBLISHED: 08:29, Wed, Feb 27, 2019 | UPDATED: 08:55, Wed, Feb 27, 2019

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War between India and Pakistan, the two smallest nuclear powers, could destroy civilisation, warned a physicist. Brian Toon, a Professor of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, explained his theory at a talk in February last year. Speaking at a Tedx meeting, Professor Toon claimed: “War between India and Pakistan, two of the smallest nuclear powers, with only a few hundred weapons the size of the Hiroshima bomb. We might die as unintended consequences that the Indian and Pakistani generals never even gave us a thought about. My colleagues Luke Oman and Alman Roebuck calculated the spread of smoke after a war between India and Pakistan.

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Stephen K. Ryan recently authored Amazon best-selling novel, “The Madonna Files” and is a proud member of the International Thriller Writer’s society Stephen has been interviewed numerous times in newspapers, radio and TV including Radio Maria and Guadalupe RadioStephen’s writing has been featured often on American Thinker, Spirit Daily, New Advent, Signs and Wonders, and SpiritDigest.com.Stephen is an avid sailboat racer having competed in dozens of regattas across the country, including ocean races from Annapolis to Newport R.I. from Newport, R.I. to Bermuda.Stephen is married to Tania and they have two children – Andrew and Meredith.